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Weekly Azure billing report per mail with Azure functions

I already blogged about Azure functions, the billing API and a few other things. In this blog post, I’ll combine some of my previous blog posts to build an Azure function that creates a weekly billing report of an Azure subscription. To build this solution, the following steps are required:

  1. Create an Azure function
  2. Configure the CRON schedule for the Azure function
  3. Read data from the Azure Billing API
  4. Create a HTML page with the billing data
  5. Send the report via email

To implement it, I’ll use Visual Studio 2017, C# and the AzureBillingAPI NuGet package that I created.

The final solution can be found on GitHub: https://github.com/codehollow/AzureBillingFunction

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Azure Invoice API – download all invoices

Since end of April 2017, there is the new Azure Invoice API available. This API allows to download the Azure invoices for a subscription as PDF file. This does currently not work for Enterprise Agreements, but according to the blog post (https://azure.microsoft.com/en-us/blog/azure-billing-reader-role-and-preview-of-invoice-api/) it is planned.
The downloaded PDF is the invoice itself. The API does currently only support to create and download invoice pdfs. It does not support to access specific costs (e.g. per resources), because this is part of the billing API. I already blogged about the billing API here: Use the Azure Billing API and calculate the costs
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Use the Azure Billing API and calculate the costs

The last days, I created a .net library that allows to read data from the Azure Billing REST APIs. You can use it to read data from the usage API, the ratecard API and it also gives you the combination of the data and does a cost calculation. The library is available as NuGet package (https://www.nuget.org/packages/CodeHollow.AzureBillingApi/) and the code is published on GitHub: https://github.com/codehollow/AzureBillingApi.
But before I jump into a short description of the library, I want to write a bit about the Azure Billing APIs:

Introduction

The Azure billing API allows to get data of your usage and the money that you have to pay for your resources. There are currently two types of the billing API:

The billing API for EA customers already returns the costs – so it’s much simpler. The REST (generic) billing API returns more data. It returns the usage of the resources and the costs per unit per resources – but it does not return the effective costs. If you want to get the costs, then you have to get the usage data and combine it with the ratecard data (the costs per unit per resource). I already blogged about each of those two APIs, but not about how to connect the data of both of them:

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Export Azure Usage data to CSV with C# and Billing API

The first important thing to mention is, that there are two types of the Azure billing API. One is the billing API for EA (enterprise agreement) customers. This API is easier to use, because it returns the costs in a separate field (extendedCosts). If you have an enterprise agreement, I recommend to check the following blog post: http://www.redbaronofazure.com/?p=631.

The other one is the billing API for non EA users (see Azure Billing REST API Reference. This API has two services, the RateCard API which returns costs for your resources (e.g. S1 DocumentDB costs per hour in region West Europe). I already blogged about how to export the RateCard data to CSV. In this post, I’ll focus on the second one which returns the usage data. This service returns the usage of your resources – e.g. “Standard IO – File Write Operation Units (in 10,000s), quantity: 3.182, …”. Unfortunately, the usage API does not return the costs per resource. If you want to know the costs, then you need to combine the RateCard data with the Usage data.

Update February 7, 2017: I built a .net library and published it as NuGet package which you can use to get data from the usage api and the ratecard api. The library also combines the usage and ratecard data and calculates the costs. The code is published on GitHub and I blogged about the usage and the configuration of it:

This blog post is still valid, it shows the how to configure and build an application that uses the Azure Billing Usage REST API.

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Export Azure RateCard data to CSV with C# and Billing API

The Azure Billing API allows to programmatically read Azure costs. On the one hand, there are is the usage of your resources (how much [unit] you already used for [resource]), on the other hand there are the basic costs for resources – so e.g. the costs for a storage account or a specific virtual machine in a specific region. Each of these two use cases has its own API: the RateCard API which returns the potential costs of the resources (“basic costs”) and the Resource Usage API which returns the usage of your resource of a subscription.

In this blog post, I’ll focus on the RateCard API. There is a sample available on GitHub, but when I used it, I ran into some issues. So I decided to developed a simple C# console application and blog about my experiences. The application reads data from the RateCard API and creates a CSV file out of it. The CSV file can be opened in Excel and should already help to do some calculations.

The application/this post is mostly inspired by: https://github.com/Azure-Samples/billing-dotnet-ratecard-api.

Update February 7, 2017: I built a .net library and published it as NuGet package which you can use to get data from the usage api and the ratecard api. The library also combines the usage and ratecard data and calculates the costs. The code is published on GitHub and I blogged about the usage and the configuration of it:

This blog post is still valid, it shows the how to configure and build an application that uses the Azure Billing RateCard REST API.

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